Virtual Author Visit: Jonathan E. Martin

Wednesday, March 24th

7:00p CT

Join us for the Crowdcast livestream here!

 

About the Book

Despite being perhaps the foremost British meteorologist of the twentieth century, Reginald Sutcliffe has been understudied and underappreciated. His impact continues to this day every time you check the weather forecast. Reginald Sutcliffe and the Invention of Modern Weather Systems Science not only details Sutcliffe’s life and ideas, but it also illuminates the impact of social movements and the larger forces that propelled him on his consequential trajectory.

Less than a century ago, a forecast of the weather tomorrow was considered a practical impossibility. This book makes the case that three important advances guided the development of modern dynamic meteorology, which led directly to the astounding progress in weather forecasting―and that Sutcliffe was the pioneer in all three of these foundational developments: the application of the quasi-geostrophic simplification to the equations governing atmospheri

c behavior, adoption of pressure as the vertical coordinate in analysis, and development of a diagnostic equation for vertical air motions.

Shining a light on Sutcliffe’s life and work will, hopefully, inspire a renewed appreciation for the human dimension in scientific progress and the rich legacy bequeathed to societies wise enough to fully embrace investments in education and basic research. As climate change continues to grow more dire, modern extensions of Sutcliffe’s innovations increasingly offer some of the best tools we have for peering into the long-term future of our environment.



About the Author

Professor Jonathan Martin joined the faculty in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UW–Madison in 1994 after completing his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington.

Professor Martin has received numerous accolades for his teaching, including the Underkofler Excellence in Teaching Award, a fellowship in UW’s Teaching Academy, and the Mark H. Ingraham Distinguished Faculty Award. He was chosen for the prestigious UW Vilas Distinguished Service Professorship, for distinguished scholarship and excellence in teaching and service. The Princeton Review recently ranked Professor Martin among the top 300 best professors in the nation.

Professor Martin’s research expertise is in mid-latitude weather systems. Over his career he has authored over 50 scientific papers, as well as the leading textbook on mid-latitude atmospheric dynamics. He also appears regularly on Wisconsin Public Radio as part of the two-man “Weather Guys” segment.